News & Events

UV Safety Month

Posted on

Ultraviolet light: The rays are notoriously harmful to our skin, but how much do you know about the effects on our eyes? UV light can damage your eyes in a number of ways; it’s crucial we educate ourselves on the impacts of these harmful rays.

Continue reading

How Much Do You Know About Eye Health

Posted on

Americans are statistically more afraid of vision loss than most other health ailments, such as heart disease, cancer, and stroke; yet, only 20% of Americans are able to identify the three main causes of vision loss in America: diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. The good news is, it is never too late to educate yourself on proper eye care, warning signs of eye diseases, and treatment options for ocular conditions. Here, we will explore some critical eye care questions most Americans were not able to accurately answer.

Continue reading

Eye Drop Tips

Posted on

It’s no secret that we all dread taking eyedrops: the mounting anxiety over that little bottle is enough to drive some people straight into eye territory dryer than Death Valley. Our ophthalmologists say taking eyedrops is crucial for one’s eye health if they have a condition that will benefit from them. This doesn’t mean you’re doomed to discomfort; rather, you just need a little help from your friends at EYE-Q with our insider tips and tricks for making eyedrops easy.

Continue reading

Cataract Awareness Month

Posted on

June is Cataract Awareness Month! Cataracts affect most Americans around the ages of 60 to 70 years of age, and generally occur as a result of the eyes maturing normally with time. Cataracts are the clouding in the eye’s natural lens which diminishes the quality of one’s vision. Fortunately, the most common cause of vision loss worldwide is treatable. Read on to educate yourself on risk factors, warning signs, and treatment options for cataracts.

Continue reading

Amblyopia

Posted on

When you think of “lazy”, you probably imagine lounging on the couch with snacks in one hand and a TV remote in the other—but when it comes to vision, there’s a different kind of lazy. It’s called amblyopia; you may know it as the lazy eye.

Continue reading